vacation

Daily

With all the respect in the World to Dave2.

Sometimes I regret that I’m a “daily blogger.”

The reason I write daily is because I know my blog would die a long, slow death if I started skipping days. First I’d skip once or twice a month… then skip once or twice a week… and then, before I even realize it, I’m struggling to write two entries a month. At which point Blogography is dead. I’ve seen it happen with other blogs many times before. And so I continue to post something every single day, even if I don’t have anything to write about or I’m going through something that can’t be blogged.

Like today.

I got nuthin’…

I read this entry from Dave2 a few days ago, and boy did it stir a lot of emotions in me.

I think i’ve known on some level that this blog was destined to die the slow painful death Dave2 mentions in his post (which is in itself brilliant since he posted about posting nothing).

I saw this commercial on tv where this grandma is bothering this young woman eating oatmeal at some fast food chain (I think it’s McDonald’s) and the twist of the commercial is that the grandma is a blogger and she exclaims: “I gotta Blog about that!”. I remember 5-6 years ago when I would say this – or any variation thereof – twenty times a day.

  • Videotron technician installs my new modem and leaves 150 yards of coax cable in a jumbled mess under my desk? I gotta Blog about that!
  • Someone in my family goes to the dentist? I gotta Blog about that!
  • There’s a piece of cheese in my glass of water? I gotta Blog about that!
  • I read a new book? I gotta Blog about that!
  • Saw a guy pick his nose on the bus? I gotta Blog about that!
  • Nothing special happened today? I gotta Blog about that!

Those were the days. Nowadays, I feel like I never have anything to Blog about. I’ll post pictures on Facebook, check-in on Foursquare and Tweet all day, but when it comes down to writing something on this blog… Nothing. I feel like I have become a grandma of the good old days of blogging.

At the same time, I feel like I’m just following the newer generations of on-line people: I just want everything right now without having to wait for anything.

What I loved about blogging has been overshadowed by the instant gratification I get from the newer ways to interact instantaneously with all of you. Gone are the days where thinking about a blog post all day, then writing it at night in front of the TV, setting it to post at midnight only to read comments the next day were part of the excitement of blogging. Now it’s make a quick reply on Twitter or post a few insane comments on Facebook between a few tasks at work, get a few laughs/replies and move on to the next task, until the next micro-break. Repeat ad nauseam.

Maybe I just need a break from all that instant gratification stuff and really rekindle my love for the written word, making a giant pied-de-nez to all those self-imposed rules about not blogging about this or that. Maybe I just need to give up and finally pull the plug on this blog – it’s been on life support for quite a while now.

Maybe I just need an actual vacation.

 

 

Advertisements

Trip / Vacation

A few days ago, I told you I’ll eventually tell you the difference between a trip and a vacation.

To summarize, a vacation is something you do to relax. A trip is something you do to learn things, fulfill a childhood dream, learn new things, visit a new country from North to South and East to West, climb a mountain…

Some examples:

  • Spending the summer enjoying the pool in your backyard. (vacation)
  • Spending one week camping on a deserted Island. (trip)
  • Climbing Mount Everest. (trip)
  • Going to Scotland for two weeks, visiting 18 distilleries and driving 2,500 miles. (trip)
  • Spending one week in a five star all-inclusive resort in Cuba. (vacation)
  • Renting a cottage for the summer. (trip)
  • Going to Italy for a month with the kids. (trip)

In order to know if you’re planning a trip or a vacation, picture yourself doing the thing you are going to do. Now picture yourself coming back home after having done the thing you planned to do. Picture yourself dropping luggage in your hallway. Now read this sentence out loud:

“I could totally use a week to rest from this!”

If you can see yourself saying something like this, you’re planning a trip. Not a vacation.

I must be extremely clear on this point: There is absolutely nothing wrong about planning a trip. I think trips are defining moments in my life, and I’m glad I’m planning / doing them. I think going to Scotland was truly the trip of a lifetime.

However, it was not a vacation.

There is something inherently devastating about thinking that you’re going to go on a vacation only to discover that you’re really going on a trip. There are also a few people that I know very very well *cough* LovelyWife *cough* that can’t tell the difference between a trip and a vacation. Those people *cough* LovelyWife *cough* would most likely have this list:

  • Spending the summer enjoying the pool in your backyard. (doing nothing)
  • Spending one week camping on a deserted Island. (vacation)
  • Climbing Mount Everest. (vacation)
  • Going to Scotland for two weeks, visiting 18 distilleries and driving 2,500 miles. (vacation)
  • Spending one week in a five star all-inclusive resort in Cuba. (spending money to do nothing)
  • Renting a cottage for the summer. (vacation)
  • Going to Italy for a month with the kids. (vacation)

As you can probably guess, planning something to do as a family for the summer in our house is the constant source of headaches and arguments, normally ending in one of us saying “We’ll do what you want LovelyWife”. It always starts the same way: “What are we doing for vacations this summer?”. Then we’ll each list things that we’d like to do on post-its. It’ll inevitably end up looking like this:

If you didn’t guess yet, I use blue post-its.

So to my LovelyWife I say this:

Even when life with you is far from a vacation; you’ll remain now and forever, the trip of my lifetime. XXX

Because you know that I could totally use a week to rest from this.